Rams (15)

Director Grímur Hákonarson. Icelandic Drama


In a secluded valley in Iceland, Gummi and Kiddi live side by side, tending to their sheep. Their ancestral sheep-stock is considered one of the country’s best, and the two brothers are repeatedly awarded for their prized rams who carry an ancient lineage. Although they share the land and a way of life, Gummi and Kiddi have not spoken to each other in four decades. When a lethal disease suddenly infects Kiddi’s sheep, the entire valley comes under threat. "It is a simple narrative, beautifully crafted and sensitively acted against the backdrop of the barren Icelandic landscape" Flick Promoter

Starring Sigurður Sigurjónsson, Theodór Júlíusson, Charlotte Bøving, Jon Benonysson, Gunnar Jónsson, Þorleifur Einarsson


Flicks Advisor (comments from our film promoters)

This was a film well worth showing and it prompted much discussion afterwards. It is a simple narrative, beautifully crafted and sensitively acted against the backdrop of the barren Icelandic landscape. The simple almost mournful music added to the sense of isolation. Our attendance was near the top end at 47 which surprised us on a cold winters evening. Some people loved it, almost all thought it worth seeing and just a few gave it a bottom end score of 4 (out of ten). Some may find it useful to read an online interview with the director to appreciate some interesting aspects of the film. Don't be put off by the need for subtitles, the dialogue is sparse and the audience quickly slips into subtitle mode. No one mentioned this as an issue. Some people said the film was a brave choice and a refreshing change from the usual blockbusters. I say go for it!

Definitely needed to turn the heating up - we had the blu-ray version which enhanced the Icelandic scenery. The write-up on the box described it as a dead-pan comedy - it certainly had it's moments but the carefully observed scenes when he lost his sheep were very good. You have to watch the credits - half of Iceland must have participated !

Loved this quirky film which had lots to say for our rural sheep farming community that has had its own trials with BSE.

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